TicSalut
Generalitat de Catalunya - Departament de Salut
Home > Current News > Flash TicSalut Versió en anglès

Flash TicSalut

Flash TicSalut

August 1st, 2016

#92

Last issues Portada #92

Interview

“The disability sector perceives ICT as a means to achieve a better quality of life and the sector of innovation must be promoted to make it more accessible."

On the past 18 June, Ideathon was held to present Apps per a Tothom, a project to create accessible and universal applications for citizens, promoted by the Observatory of Physical Disability and in which more than 50 people took part. We have talked to its coordinator, Jordi Serratosa, the founder of Punt Zero. Jordi Serratosa is the founder of Punt Zero, from where he develops projects in ICT, focusing a lot of his time on collaborating with the third sector with entities such as the Association of Blood Donors of Barcelona, the Sant Jordi Association of Amputated Persons and COCEMFE Barcelona. As a result of this collaboration with these entities, which drove the Observatory of Physical Disability, the Apps per a Tothom project started up as a challenge for developers committed to accessible and universal technology.

 “The disability sector perceives ICT as a means to achieve a better quality of life and the sector of innovation must be promoted to make it more accessible."

Jordi Serratosa presents us with "Apps per a Tothom" (Apps for Everyone), a project intended to create an incubation ecosystem of applications based on the Design and Universal Accessibility paradigm.

Our hope is that the project might serve to enhance and drive other initiatives already up and running. In this sense, we believe that the Apps per a Tothom project can facilitate the entry of applications in the AppSalut portal.

On the past 18 June, Ideathon was held to present Apps per a Tothom, a project to create accessible and universal applications for citizens, promoted by the Observatory of Physical Disability and in which more than 50 people took part. We have talked to its coordinator, Jordi Serratosa, the founder of Punt Zero.

Jordi Serratosa is the founder of Punt Zero, from where he develops projects in ICT, focusing a lot of his time on collaborating with the third sector with entities such as the Association of Blood Donors of Barcelona, the Sant Jordi Association of Amputated Persons and COCEMFE Barcelona. As a result of this collaboration with these entities, which drove the Observatory of Physical Disability, the Apps per a Tothom project started up as a challenge for developers committed to accessible and universal technology.

  • On the past 18 June, Apps per a Tothom was officially presented. Could you tell us how this project arose and what its goals are?

The project arose thanks to the work of the Observatory of Physical Disability (ODF). In March 2015, a meeting of strategic reflection was held where different entities related to disability, members of the public administration and also of private corporations got together in order to plan the lines of action of the ODF. Here it became clear that the disability sector perceives ICT as a means for achieving a better quality of life and that the innovation sector must be encouraged to make it more accessible. However, we also saw that there is a very wide range of apps and a system for classifying these apps that does not generally help possible users.

These reflections led the ODF to make the survey on disability and ICT, which showed that 2 out of every 3 disabled persons trust in ICT to improve their daily lives.

In this context, we planned Apps per a Tothom, a project with which we aimed to create an ecosystem of applications incubation based on the Design and Universal Accessibility paradigm. We want applications that help us to improve our daily lives in different thematic areas.

To extend the scope and influence of this project, we framed it within the international Smart City Hack, in which cities from around the world consider the challenges that can be achieved through apps for mobile devices.

  • What consideration do you make of the Ideathon meeting with the participation of more than 50 people? What is the profile of the participants you brought together?

It was a highly enriching meeting. Although the conditions didn’t help us, it was a rainy Saturday with a strike on public transport, we managed to bring in people with very different profiles, developers, creators, entrepreneurs, professionals of the disabled sector and also disabled people with ideas for seeking solutions. In the most important thing is that the project has but begun, and we encourage everyone to take part via the online platform accessible via the Smart City Hack website.

  • The Department of Health and Fundació TicSalut have just started up the AppSalut portal in order to encourage citizens to look after their own health via certified mobile applications. What synergies could arise between your project and this new Portal?

Our hope is that this project might serve to enhance and give a drive to other initiatives already up and running. In this sense, we believe that the Apps per a Tothom project might make it easier for applications to enter the AppSalut portal. Apart from this, when the incubation stage is over and in the tender itself, we are committed to bringing the solutions brought to us by the participants of the user entities with which we work from the ODF. At these meetings, we will also be able to promote the AppSalut portal and identify people to act as app evaluators.

  • During the meeting, one of the details that most struck us was that “2 out of every 3 people trust in technologies to improve their quality of life”. What are the most habitual demands of the citizens in this sense?

The most ritual demands we have found have to do with mobility. Unfortunately this is the star theme. And not only physical accessibility, but also access to information: what trains/buses are actually adapted, what kind of adaptation they have, to have this information linked to the timetables, etc. Also the improvement of some public services such as the “Door to Door”. Aside from this, the concern of people of reduced mobility is not limited to transport, but relates to the “accessibility chain“, in other words it is fine that the underground should be adapted, but will I find barriers on my way to the underground station?

Also general access to leisure and culture. Material prepared for the visually disabled and once more access to information. What places are really adapted and how, if I’m going to a concert maybe the room is adapted but will I have a bad time if there are many people? These are the kinds of messages that users often send us.

  • Finally, what are the next challenges you have considered and how might we collaborate from the Administration?

Our short-term challenge is to make a good dissemination of the Apps per a Tothom in order to have many projects to help the community of entrepreneurs to identify the opportunity in making apps that can be used by the largest possible number of people. It is calculated that around 40% of a person’s life is spent in times of dependence (infancy, illness, old age, etc.). Making technology facilitate our lives at these times and being able to use it regardless of our conditions would help us to enjoy a more comfortable life.           

The Administration must guarantee that the innovation is social, has the maximum possible effect on the people and is aimed at resolving what they most need. 

Share